Author Topic: Russian aerial theodolite  (Read 418 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Zbig Fiema

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 775
Russian aerial theodolite
« on: November 19, 2017, 09:45:40 PM »
Unfortunately, I know nothing about it except that it is supposed to be some sort of aerial theodolite produced in Soviet Union in Aerogeoinstrument factory. The number of wheels, knobs and levers is staggering; do not know the function of most of these. I guess this is probably one of the last fully optical ones before the introduction of laser instruments. The monster weights more than 25 kg.

Greg Boreland

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 309
Re: Russian aerial theodolite
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2017, 01:51:50 AM »
That is a great piece of optics as you say very complex construction. I really like the internals of the case it's in great condition. You certainly have some unusual optics in your collection.
                                                                                                          Thanks for sharing Zbig

Jürg Dedual

  • Membership
  • *
  • Posts: 6
Re: Russian aerial theodolite
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2020, 01:11:35 PM »
Hello Zbig,
what you have is a "Schraubenmikroskop - Theodolit" (normally a Astro Theo would have a broken telescope ...)
The vertical circle only goes from about +/-15° and so it indicates that it was used in horizontal applications, e.g. for tunnel application. In Switzerland, the Simplon was measured with a similar instrument from Kern.

I assume is a Russian copy of a Askania, Hildebrand, Fennel or Heyde.

I have a copy of a Wild T3, from the same Russian company, similar type plate and the same name ... on mine there is also a date above the serial number, next the the company name ... mine is from 1967 and I assume your's from the same period.

regards
Jürg




Zbig Fiema

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 775
Re: Russian aerial theodolite
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2020, 05:44:31 AM »
Hello Jürg,
thank you for your comments. I really did not know what it serves for... I have assumed that it is a kind of aerial theodolite produced by Aerogeoinstrument factory in 1958. But your comments make sense. I am just not sure what you have meant by "a broken telescope"? It has two: the main one which moves in azimuth and elevation and a smaller one which is permanently horizontal. Best regards, Zbig