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Carl Zeiss Nr. 8 DF. 35x 58x 116x 130mm double telescope

Started by Martin Soerensen, August 20, 2020, 10:16:19 PM

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Martin Soerensen

August 20, 2020, 10:16:19 PM Last Edit: August 20, 2020, 10:32:56 PM by Martin Soerensen
dear friends,
here a recent acquisition which I am happy to share here with you.
The story that came along with this DF.:
It was originally purchased by the city of Turin. During the second world war, it was installed in a bunker above the city of Genoa (Rodolfo, in your backyard), used for overlooking the maritime traffic. This bunker was damaged heavy during an attack, and abandoned. The binoculars were left there, intact, and only rediscovered in the 1960's.

I first learned of the binoculars nearly 9 years ago, now it is back in Germany. The optics are spectacular, also for astronomical use.
Magnification           
35x; FOV 21m at 1000m
58x: FOV 13m at 1000m
116x FOV 6m at 1000m

The binocular is 60kg, 199cm long
the base is 170kg
All good things will come to those who believe

Martin Soerensen

The cast iron base is, like the binocular itself very heavy. But a magnificent piece of kit, which works like fresh from the factory
All good things will come to those who believe

Martin Soerensen

All good things will come to those who believe

Rodolfo Peirano

Super congrat Martin,

Most likely it was mounted on the site of the "Monte Moro" battery, one of the biggest in Genoa.

Image A (cannon bunker) image B (observatory bunker).

This night you can dream of being there.  ;)
everyone can learn from everyone - Rodolfo

Niall McLaren

"A little bit of something beats a whole lot of nothing." - Little Richard

Martin Soerensen

thank you Rodolfo, something I should visit next time I am in Genoa
All good things will come to those who believe

M Pultr


Rodolfo Peirano

Quote from: Martin Soerensen on August 20, 2020, 10:58:55 PMthank you Rodolfo, something I should visit next time I am in Genoa

I'll take your word for it.  ;)
everyone can learn from everyone - Rodolfo

Frank Weissörtel


Simon Tomlinson

An amazing find - congratulations.

The serial number is not typical for the output of the Zeiss Astro department. One would expect a 4 digit number of the form Nr. XXXX

Is there any record of when the instrument was originally purchased?

Are the two small brass objects near the prism housings for lubrication?

I like the arrow on the base. The Zeiss factory offered customers the option to have the brass disc engraved with the names of significant features, such as mountains, in the location where the telescope would be positioned, usually at a tourist location. Observers could use the arrow pointer and the information engraved on the disc to identify what they were looking at.

Martin Soerensen

Thank you Simon for the information on the brass plates this one I think was not engraved. Although I will look on the other side, maybe it has been turned around.
The small brass fittings are for adding lubricant without having to open it all.

I do not have the information on the year it was purchased, maybe worth a trip to Turin to research
All good things will come to those who believe